Schlagwort-Archive: Differencial Learning

Constraints

Constraints led or is there more? Back to the question.

Can we say, that the sportive action in this picture shows elements of differencial learning in tennis? Constraints change seeing, hearing, time, speed, field size, target, emotion,…

(Thx Mark O Sullivan for the picture, Mark is doing a wonderful job at AIK Stockholm and is writing about constraints led coaching, childrens rights in sports and more on the blog „Player development project„)

Wolfgang Schöllhorn, who has thought and researched about the best way of learning skills in sports, is helping me to understand the differences between Differential learning (DL) and the Constraints Led Approach (CLA) fixing one’s eye on the picture above.

„This is a nice example for explaining the difference of constraints led approach and differencial learning 😉 . Here you see extraordinary constraints in order to feel what you should not do in future (variant of contrast learning). But this only would become differencial learning if the boundary conditions would change next time, e.g. if the „other side“ would change the flying objects (size or speed) or if this guy would change his glasses, the mask, the racket, the technique, the target … next time. In differencial learning it is rather about the rate of change of boundary conditions, it is less about the stressful constraining situations that should be avoided next time. ;- ) “

from a facebook discussion

4 fruits

Changing constraints and using non-linear pedagogy for skill development.

Changing constraints like court size, balls, rules, equipment, court surface, interference, improves the evolution of your players game. Working differencial with regularly changing constraints without repetition gives players the chance to find creative solutions for unexpected situations of the game. Setting this in an playful approach makes motor learning and skill development more creativ and stable. 4 fruits weiterlesen

Happy Easter or the „Easter-Bunny-Pedagogy“

Happy Easter, dear innercoaching-blog.de followers!

This reminds me of a conversation with Prof. Wolfgang Schoellhorn in which he explains the differences between differential learning and a hidden traditional  „I-know-how-to-do-it“ .coaching philosophy

He calls this „Easter Bunny Pedagogy“: the coach hides the solution (stroke technique) in front of the player and later he suggests that the player has found the (given) solution by himself. Happy Easter or the „Easter-Bunny-Pedagogy“ weiterlesen

Service implicit

TennisSport - Die Fachzeitschrift für Training und Wettkampf

Goodbye textbook skills!

Non-linear pedagogy and implicit-differencial learning exemplified by the service in tennis. With many games and drills for your trainings. Coming soon here and in TennisSport 4/2017 the journal for training and competition in tennis.

Written and developed by Frercks Hartwig

Idealtechnik ade!

Non-lineare Pädagogik und implizit-differenzielles Lernen am Beispiel des Aufschlags im Tennis. Mit vielen Drills für das Training. Demnächst hier und in TennisSport 4/2017, der Fachzeitschrift für Training und Wettkampf im Tennis.

Entwickelt und zusammengefasst von Frercks Hartwig

Don’t talk, let walk

“Let the drill do the talking and the athlete do the walking”

https://www.trainer-im-leistungssport.de/sites/default/files/winkelman_nick_learning_to_sprint_40th_0.pdf

In this article Nick Winkelman is talking about science of coaching and using new scientific knowledge in developing skills in sports. He gives an overview about constraints led coaching, the advantage of external focus, differencial learning and optimizing the transfer from pratice to the game. As we already know 😉 this implicits a new communication between player and coach.

Winkelmann is the head of athletic performance & science for the Irish Rugby Football Union. Prior to working for Irish Rugby, Nick was the director of education for EXOS (formerly Athletes’ Performance), located in Phoenix, AZ. As a performance coach, Nick oversaw the speed and assessment component of the EXOS NFL Combine Development Program. Nick has also supported many athletes in the NFL, MLB, NBA, National Sport Organizations and Military. Nick is an internationally recognized speaker on human performance and coaching science, and has multiple publications through the UKSCA, NSCA and IDEA Health and Fitness.

 

Don’t be proud of practice

„Don’t just be proud of practice, but look at how practice and training actually transfers to the field. If you’re making baseball players faster, does it actually result in more stolen bases? If you’re making golf players stronger, can they actually drive the ball farther and more accurately when they’re on the golf course?“
This link leads to a presentation by Nick Winkelmann with objects about coaching in running. Using goals, errors, constraints, external focus, contextual interference and differencial learning:
  • Discuss a technical model for sprinting from a dynamic
  • systems perspective
  • Discuss an error model for sprinting from a dynamic systems
  • perspective
  • Discuss a constrain-based coaching model with emphasis placed on instruction/feedback and practice design