Schlagwort-Archive: constraints led

Constraints never end…

Following the principles of differential learning and the constraints led approach, we can change the constraints without repeating them the next practice. Regular variation without repetition and the trust in new studies about motor learning gives the coaches and the players more than a handful of various drills. This one is about changing constraints by starting from unusual points in the tennis field. This requires adaptation to all players and opens doors to new solutions of game situations.

Change rules – a double drill

Playing the game with rules outside the rules brings players in a situation where they have to solve problems outside the manifested behaviour. We can manipulate court size, rules, time, counting, context of the game and other settings surrounding the game. This improves tactics and skills. In this double drill players have to adapt the direction of the service, the return in a double, the netplay and particularly in the teamwork collusion between server and netplayer.

CLA is not DL, but….

This is from Nick Jacques Tennis. Nice ideas for a constraints led approach (CLA). This already shows the difference between CLA and differential learning (DL). In the CLA the intention and the plan for the development of the skills is an idea of the coach („avoiding backswing“). In a DL approach the coach also offers different situations (like those in this video). But the solution is in the responsibility of the player, not in the responsibility of the coach!

Both approaches are implicit, but there is an important difference in the attitude to the learning athlet. While the coach in the CLA drill has a goal (backswing), the DL coach knows and intends nothing. The system „player“ is a black box and there is no expectation in the long term development of individual skills. The examples in Nicks CLA are in DL only one possible solution for the motion and will not be repeated.

Thx to Nick for the nice ideas 😀. I love his quote: „I have no influence over this as I am still with very little noise from me.“

3 constraint led approach drills that have helped reduce the size of my students take back. Lillian has previously been taught a large loop on her take back which has isolated her upper body from her lower body, making it very hard for her to adapt to the many different balls she would need to cope with in a match situation. Lillian has made great improvements on her coordination, here are a few key exercises that have helped her progress. Note how Lillian is intrinsically motivated as the exercises engages her and draws out the effort, you can see I have no influence over this as I am still with very little noise from me 🤗

Gepostet von Jacques Tennis Seminars am Freitag, 14. Dezember 2018

“ 3 constraint led approach drills that have helped reduce the size of my students take back. Lillian has previously been taught a large loop on her take back which has isolated her upper body from her lower body, making it very hard for her to adapt to the many different balls she would need to cope with in a match situation. Lillian has made great improvements on her coordination, here are a few key exercises that have helped her progress. Note how Lillian is intrinsically motivated as the exercises engages her and draws out the effort, you can see I have no influence over this as I am still with very little noise from me 🤗 „

4 fruits

Changing constraints and using non-linear pedagogy for skill development.

Changing constraints like court size, balls, rules, equipment, court surface, interference, improves the evolution of your players game. Working differencial with regularly changing constraints without repetition gives players the chance to find creative solutions for unexpected situations of the game. Setting this in an playful approach makes motor learning and skill development more creativ and stable. 4 fruits weiterlesen

Constraints

(for the english text scroll down, thx)

In einem systemdynamischen und non-linearen Lernansatz geht es darum, über die Veränderung der Rahmenbedingungen und der Aufgabenstellungen den Spieler*innen eine individuelle Entwicklung von Technik und Taktik zu ermöglichen. In diesem auch „constraints-led-approach“ genannten Zugang fordern neue Situationen neues Denken und neue Lösungen heraus. Dieser Ansatz ist nach dem aktuellen Stand der wissenschaftlichen Forschung effektiver und nachhaltiger als der traditionelle methodische Ansatz in dem der Coach der Experte für die Lösungswege ist und diese vorgibt (v.a. bei der Technikentwicklung).

In einer non-linearen Pädagogik ist es aber trotzdem noch zu oft der Coach, der die Rahmenbedingungen verändert um ein von ihm vorgegebenes Bewegungsziel zu erreichen oder um eine bestimmte nach seiner Erfahrung erfolgreiche oder in Lehrbüchern beschriebene  Technik-/Taktikvariante zu „provozieren“. http://www.tms-tennis.de/inner-coaching/happy-easter-or-the-easter-bunny-pedagogy/

Das differenzielle Lernen  (nach Wolfgang Schöllhorn) geht da deutlich weiter und überlässt den Spieler*innen die Suche nach individuellen Lösungen für neue Aufgabenstellungen. Die Rahmenbedingungen werden ständig verändert und nicht wiederholt (ständige Variation). Dabei können auch „Fehler“ eingebaut werden. Dies entspricht einer konsequenten Umsetzung systemtheorischen Denkens in dem der Coach vollständig auf die Selbstorganisationsfähigkeit der Spieler*innen vertraut. Neue Erkenntnisse aus der Kreativitätsforschung im Sport unterstützen dieses Denken.

In der im folgenden beschriebenen Trainingseinheit Constraints weiterlesen

Happy Easter or the „Easter-Bunny-Pedagogy“

Happy Easter, dear innercoaching-blog.de followers!

This reminds me of a conversation with Prof. Wolfgang Schoellhorn in which he explains the differences between differential learning and a hidden traditional  „I-know-how-to-do-it“ .coaching philosophy

He calls this „Easter Bunny Pedagogy“: the coach hides the solution (stroke technique) in front of the player and later he suggests that the player has found the (given) solution by himself. Happy Easter or the „Easter-Bunny-Pedagogy“ weiterlesen