Adopting and accepting non-linear pedagogy

„A child’s view of their own sporting experience is very different. It’s generally about fun, friends, competition, play, learning and a love of the game. That’s easy to forget if you’re an all-too-serious adult.“

„Through sport, children enjoy the opportunity to learn so many lessons that apply to life. Achievement, failure, team work, adaptability, winning, pride, overcoming adversity, purpose and more. If we create environments with the player at the heart of it that includes challenge, but is driven by understanding then we can help them navigate through the ups and downs, ensuring they develop as people and players. Adopting and accepting non-linear pedagogy means that the coach embraces the learning process from their own and the player’s perspective, resulting in an ability to work with the many forces at play.“

The Player

Don’t talk, let walk

“Let the drill do the talking and the athlete do the walking”

https://www.trainer-im-leistungssport.de/sites/default/files/winkelman_nick_learning_to_sprint_40th_0.pdf

In this article Nick Winkelman is talking about science of coaching and using new scientific knowledge in developing skills in sports. He gives an overview about constraints led coaching, the advantage of external focus, differencial learning and optimizing the transfer from pratice to the game. As we already know 😉 this implicits a new communication between player and coach.

Winkelmann is the head of athletic performance & science for the Irish Rugby Football Union. Prior to working for Irish Rugby, Nick was the director of education for EXOS (formerly Athletes’ Performance), located in Phoenix, AZ. As a performance coach, Nick oversaw the speed and assessment component of the EXOS NFL Combine Development Program. Nick has also supported many athletes in the NFL, MLB, NBA, National Sport Organizations and Military. Nick is an internationally recognized speaker on human performance and coaching science, and has multiple publications through the UKSCA, NSCA and IDEA Health and Fitness.

 

Don’t be proud of practice

„Don’t just be proud of practice, but look at how practice and training actually transfers to the field. If you’re making baseball players faster, does it actually result in more stolen bases? If you’re making golf players stronger, can they actually drive the ball farther and more accurately when they’re on the golf course?“
This link leads to a presentation by Nick Winkelmann with objects about coaching in running. Using goals, errors, constraints, external focus, contextual interference and differencial learning:
  • Discuss a technical model for sprinting from a dynamic
  • systems perspective
  • Discuss an error model for sprinting from a dynamic systems
  • perspective
  • Discuss a constrain-based coaching model with emphasis placed on instruction/feedback and practice design

Half fielders – double drill

Nonlinear pedagogy in tennis coaching. Developing and improving double skills and tactics. This drill should lead to a better view on cross court play in a double. This is helpful for a greater variation in tactics from serving, returning to using the volley and lobs.

Nonlineare Pädagogik im Tennistraining. Eine Übung zur Entwicklung eines erfolgreichen Doppelspiels durch die Ermöglichung eines veränderten Blicks auf die Bedeutung des Crossspiels im Doppel und die sich daraus ergebenden Varianten in der Taktik. Aus den veränderten Rahmenbedingungen ergibt sich ein impliziter Zugang zum Aufschlag, Stellungssspiel und Einsatz des Volley im Doppel.

Trough the middle

Nonlinear pedagogy in coaching tennis. Another constraints led drill. This time to improve the precision of your service and to confront the returner with differing situations in a game situation. Serving through the „middle“ is an important skill for doubles.

Nonlineare Pädagogik im Tennistraining. Ein weiterer durch Einschränkungen manipulierter Trainingsdrill zur Verbesserung und Erweiterung der Bewegungs-, Technik- und Taktikoptionen. Ziele: Verbesserung der Auschlagspräzision und Konfrontation des Rückschlägers mit veränderten Rahmenbedingungen in Spielsituationen. Der Aufschlag durch die MItte ist eine wichtige Fähigkeit für das Doppelspiel.

Facebook groups in good discussions

There are very good discussions in some facebook groups about non linear (implicit) and linear (explicit) coaching in tennis. While we have a lot of studies about implicit learning in sports like basketball, cricket and volleyball, there is still a lack of targeted research in tennis. At the same time accustomed truths beginn to waver. Methodical traditionalism with clear statement to „technique coaching first“ is no more the only way to coach, yes it is heavily critisized.  Action approach and game based learning are essential elements in the Play and Stay concept of the ITF and of national tennis associations all over the world with changing constraints like balls, fields, rackets, rules and more. But there is coming up a confrontation between the representatives of a „both is possible“ and those who plead for the purity of implicit learning.

In any case there are some clues that indicate the need to overthink traditional explicit coaching that has a primarly focus on the players technique. Facebook groups in good discussions weiterlesen

Comparing dynamical systems concepts and techniques for biomechanical analysis

Abstract

Traditional biomechanical analyses of human movement are generally derived from linear mathematics. While these methods can be useful in many situations, they do not describe behaviors in human systems that are predominately nonlinear. For this reason, nonlinear analysis methods based on a dynamical systems approach have become more prevalent in recent literature. These analysis techniques have provided new insights into how systems (1) maintain pattern stability, (2) transition into new states, and (3) are governed by short- and long-term (fractal) correlational processes at different spatio-temporal scales. These different aspects of system dynamics are typically investigated using concepts related to variability, stability, complexity, and adaptability. The purpose of this paper is to compare and contrast these different concepts and demonstrate that, although related, these terms represent fundamentally different aspects of system dynamics. In particular, we argue that variability should not uniformly be equated with stability or complexity of movement. In addition, current dynamic stability measures based on nonlinear analysis methods (such as the finite maximal Lyapunov exponent) can reveal local instabilities in movement dynamics, but the degree to which these local instabilities relate to global postural and gait stability and the ability to resist external perturbations remains to be explored. Finally, systematic studies are needed to relate observed reductions in complexity with aging and disease to the adaptive capabilities of the movement system and how complexity changes as a function of different task constraints.

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2095254616000156

Matt Kuzdub on dynamical systems theory and coaching tennis

Some things are wonderful 🙂 . One of them is to find somebody, who shares my convictions. Matt Kuzdub, tennis coach, and a facebook friend, has written a wonderful statement about non-linear pedagogy and the dynamical systems theory and what it means for learning and coaching in tennis. I am working with kids and players, who  come for one or two hours in the week to play tennis under the guidance of a professional coach. Matt is working with very ambitioned players and goes with them significantly more intense. But he shares my perception: there is a better way to learn and to coach. And it is evidence based!

http://www.mattspoint.com/blog/learning-in-tennis-an-intro-to-dynamical-systems-theory

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